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June Reads

July 6th, 2015 · 2 Comments · Reads

June Comics

Cloonan, Becky, Brenden Fletcher, Karl Kerschl, and Bob Kane. 2015. Gotham Academy. Volume 1, Volume 1.
My take: Fun read about a mysterious school- are they fledgling superheros? We’re not sure yet.

Stewart, Cameron, Brenden Fletcher, Babs Tarr, Irene Koh, Maris Wicks, Jared K. Fletcher, and Bryan Hitch. 2015. Batgirl. Volume 1, Volume 1.
My take: Somewhat of a Batgirl re-boot as a young adult in grad school (sadly NOT library school). First half of this volume is most interesting. Art throughout is gorgeous.

 

Wilson, G. Willow, Adrian Alphona, Ian Herring, Joe Caramagna, Sara Pichelli, Justin Ponsor, Jamie Mckelvie, and Matthew Wilson. 2014. Ms. Marvel.

Wilson, G. Willow, Jacob Wyatt, Adrian Alphona, Ian Herring, Joe Caramagna, Jamie Mckelvie, Matthew Wilson, and Kris Anka. 2015. Ms. Marvel. vol. 2, vol. 2.

My take: Read these back to back. The new Ms. Marvel is the best of the younger superhero set. Dealing with strict parents and sudden superpowers she’s not sure how to control, I look forward most to following her journey.

 

June Books
Moriarty, Liane, and Caroline Lee. 2014. Big little lies. [New York]: Penguin Audio.
My take: A LOT of mommy-drama dragged a bit in the beginning, picked up interest in the middle and an end I didn’t predict. Light, fun, mystery.

Johnson, T. Geronimo. 2015. Welcome to Braggsville.
My take: So much satire, and social commentary packed into a compelling story sometimes difficult to follow as it is all inside the head of one character.

hooks, bell. 1981. Ain’t I a woman: Black women and feminism. Boston, MA: South End Press.
My take: Fantastic and important perspective and history of feminism. If I ruled the world, we would have all read and discussed this book in high school.

Beatty, Robert. 2015. Serafina and the black cloak.
My take: Middle grade fairy tale/mystery. Good for fans of the TV series Once Upon a Time. Serafina’s strong, spunky character makes you root for her.

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5 Books for Young People about Protest and Social Change

June 1st, 2015 · 3 Comments · Reads

5 Books for young people about social change

The news around the country about civil unrest, inequality and protest provide teachable moments with young people. Here are 5 stories from history to spark conversation:

Markel, Michelle, Melissa Sweet, and Rachel Zegar. 2013. Brave girl: Clara and the Shirtwaist Makers’ Strike of 1909. (find in a library)

An illustrated account of immigrant Clara Lemlich’s pivotal role in the influential 1909 women laborer’s strike describes how she worked grueling hours to acquire an education and support her family before organizing a massive walkout to protest the unfair working conditions in New York’s garment district.

 

McDonough, Yona Zeldis, and Malcah Zeldis. 2002. Peaceful protest: the life of Nelson Mandela.  (find in a library)

A biography of the South African leader who became a civil rights activist, political prisoner, and president of South Africa.

 

Sheinkin, Steve. 2014. The Port Chicago 50: disaster, mutiny, and the fight for civil rights. (find in a library)

Presents an account of the 1944 civil rights protest involving hundreds of African-American Navy servicemen who were unjustly charged with mutiny for refusing to work in unsafe conditions after the deadly Port Chicago (Oakland, CA) explosion.

 

Tonatiuh, Duncan. 2014. Separate is never equal: Sylvia Mendez & her family’s fight for desegregation. (find in a library)

Years before the landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling Brown v. Board of Education, Sylvia Mendez, an eight-year-old girl of Mexican and Puerto Rican heritage, played an instrumental role in Mendez v. Westminster, the landmark desegregation case of 1946 in California

 

Weatherford, Carole Boston, and Jerome Lagarrigue. 2005. Freedom on the menu: the Greensboro sit-ins. (find in a library)

The 1960 civil rights sit-ins at the Woolworth’s lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina, are seen through the eyes of a young Southern black girl.

 

 

 

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Read all the books – finished and listed

February 20th, 2014 · 4 Comments · books, Entertainment, Reads, Uncategorized

If you are not touched by the video above, I don’t think we can be friends.

Books finished in the past month:

I am Malala : the girl who stood up for education by Malala Yousafzai

“I told myself, Malala, you have already faced death. This is your second life. Don’t be afraid — if you are afraid, you can’t move forward.”

The fault in our stars by John Green

“The world is not a wish-granting factory.”

“Sometimes, you read a book and it fills you with this weird evangelical zeal, and you become convinced that the shattered world will never be put back together unless and until all living humans read the book.”

Takedown Twenty by Janet Evanovich

“Babe,” Ranger said, “you need to make some decisions.” “I made decisions. I’m just having a hard time sticking to them.”

Books added to my “to read” shelf:

Quesadillas: a novel by Juan Pablo Villalobos , trans. by Rosalind Harvey
Why: Shelf-awareness says: Like Villalobos’s first novel, Down the Rabbit Hole, Quesadillas is a child’s skewed vision of life, but this time the story is much funnier, with an economic vision of Mexico from the bottom up that’s alternately heartbreaking and hilarious. When the five-year-old twins go missing, 15-year-old Aristotle becomes convinced they’ve been abducted by aliens and takes Oreo with him to burglarize the neighbor’s pantry for supplies and then set out on a quest to rescue them.

See Jane Run by Joy Fielding
Why: The Guardian says: A woman finds herself in a shop wearing nothing but a coat, the pockets of which are stuffed full of money. She has lost her memory and has no idea who she is, so when a man comes forward claiming to be her husband, and armed with plenty of proof, she has no choice but to let him take her home … This is the archetypal Everywoman-plunged-into-a-nightmare novel.

The thirteenth tale : a novel by Diane Setterfield
Why: When her health begins failing, the mysterious author Vida Winter decides to let Margaret Lea, a biographer, write the truth about her life, but Margaret needs to verify the facts since Vida has a history of telling outlandish tales.

How to Be Invisible by Tim Lott
Why: The Times Higher Ed says: Strato Nyman couldn’t be more of an odd-one-out. He’s the only black kid in Hedgecombe-upon-Dray, he knows more about particle physics than his teacher, and he’s constantly picked on by school bully Lloyd Archibald Turnbull. It’s only at home that he blends in to the background – his parents are too busy arguing to notice he exists.

The Righteous Mind Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion by Jonathan Haidt
Why: Times Higher Ed says: fascinating attempt to apply moral psychology to politics. It descibes cutting-edge research research in an entertaining accessible manner.

 

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